Category Archives: Marketing

For what seems like months, there have been rumors of the Facebook phone. But up until now, it’s proved as elusive as a jackalope or Bigfoot.

But thanks in part to Android Police and 9to5Google, we now have a lot more information about the device, which Facebook is set to announce at a press event on Thursday. (If you want a better technical understanding of just how Facebook is skinning Android, definitely head over to the Android Police post.)

From what I can gather, Facebook is not creating a new fork of Android, which is what Amazon has done with the Kindle Fire. Instead, like Motorola and others, they are skinning Android specifically for their device. The phone, by HTC, was code-named the Myst. It’s now being released as the “First”, which fits in with HTC’s “The One” product line. The phone will be heavily skinned by Facebook and when you turn it on, Facebook is the first screen you see. The new version of Facebook, for this phone in particular, will rely heavily on Facebook’s social graph.

This will be Facebook’s first real foray into the consumer marketplace. With that comes a need for advertising to the general public, which isn’t something Facebook has ever really done. To compete in the over-saturated mobile market (not to mention the Android market itself), Facebook will have to Buy Viagra really pony up some ad dollars to make an impact in the marketplace – or it will just be another phone.

Personally, I want Facebook to explain to me why I NEED a Facebook phone. I can’t for the life of me figure out why I want to be even more plugged into a social network. In fact, I’ve given serious thought to getting out. Facebook is no longer the go-to place for the younger generation. They’re on Twitter and Instagram, with Dad and Grandma hanging out on Facebook.

Aside from Facebook’s need to market this phone to consumers, there are some other interesting ??? to come out of this development. Facebook is currently a fantastic place to advertise your products (assuming your consumers are on the network) and it’s made a huge impact in how digital advertisers approach campaigns. What effect will a Facebook phone, with deeper integration of the social network, have on mobile marketing, which is still a fledgling effort?

Next, I have to wonder about Google. I love that Google’s Android system is so open, allowing developers to do a lot of what they can’t accomplish with iOS. But will that open-ness backfire on Google if Facebook’s phone can become a serious competitor?

Just some thoughts. We’ll keep you updated on the actual specs, retail info, and pricing of the phone after Thursday’s announcement.

It’s been windy and rainy in the Texas capitol, but there’s still 24,000 people huddled together for SXSWi. Day One of Interactive (for me) was about mobile marketing. Tim Reis, the head of advertising for Google, kicked it off:

Mobile marketing/advertising is now about weaving into the consumer’s device. It’s about having a conversation with the consumer. The device is used for dialogue, and marketers now have to do more than just throw banner ads out there. The real opportunity is to learn how people use their devices and interact with them to build a relationship with them.

Mobile is the signature device of the 21st century. It will also interact with the device of the 20th century: the TV. The second screen experience is where your primary focus should be for mobile advertising.

What is mobility and context? New patterns are emerging as consumers integrate multiple screens into their day. Context used to mean placing an ad next to content. Now it means where the consumer is and what they’re doing, and what mood and mode they’re in. You need electronic cigarette usa to focus on how the consumer moves across multiple screens, and their ever-changing context is.

Consumers weave seamlessly through context, doing what they do at any given moment. Devices are blurry — phones are getting larger and acting like tablets, tablets are getting smaller. The device itself is no longer important. Context is what it’s all about. We used to think about intent. Intent is a powerful signal. Combine intent and context, and you see the direction we’re going in.

Five years ago marketers thought of social, local and mobile as buckets. As new tech emerges, we tend to box them into buckets we can understand. Consumers don’t see these buckets, however.

Contextual opportunities are the essence of mobile. Consumers take their digital life with them.

Friction is also key. Eliminating friction in the process empowers your connection to your consumer (stop asking someone for their city and state when you’re also asking them for their zip code). On a phone, that friction is big. Bigger than on a laptop. Think through the friction points. Erase friction.

Ikea announced today that they will partner with Marriott to create a new budget “hotel brand” based on their prefabricated furniture model. The hotels won’t include Ikea furniture, but instead will be built based on new construction methods that stress lower-cost materials. Prefabricated hotel rooms will be built in a central location and placed wherever needs arise. This is a similar model to what some retailers are doing with popup stores in areas that swarm with large groups of people for specific events. Kind of like what Apple did at SXSW during its iPad launch the electronic cigarettes — quickly create a popup store to sell items where people are gathered, and then take the store down after the event is over.

Popup hotels could be quickly assembled in areas where events bring large amounts of people together. Even here in Austin right now, it’s virtually impossible to get a hotel room, and if you do, it’s easily $400 a night. Popup hotels could offer some relief to the need for rooms, and will attract a younger, more budget-conscious traveler.

Ikea and Marriott will launch their first popup hotel in Milan this year.

Big data — a set of technologies that apply complex algorithms to large sets of data in an attempt to extract meaningful results — is currently all about targeted marketing. For years, companies have been trying to figure out how to use the customer data they collect to create more targeted advertising. The retail world has a whole lotta data on you just sitting there waiting to be used to get you to buy more stuff.

In most instances, we all benefit from targeted ads. Retail marketing knows people will click on ads that are relevant to them. And frankly, if you’re not interested in golf, you shouldn’t be shown ads for new golf clubs. It’s as simple as that. In our ad-fueled economy, we are all aware that we have to deal with ads. Why not have ones presented to us that actually interest us?

The trouble that retail is having is how to take all the data and analyze it so that it can then be targeted appropriately. This requires a fundamental shift in how networks are designed and accessed. And on top of that, the transition to mobile is also a wrinkle for big data… how to find more sophisticated ways to parse the data. It used to take over eight weeks for a typical retail operation to analyze data feeds and extract meaningful results — now with advanced data analytics tools this type of processing can happen in one day. This may be bad news for impulse shoppers — but it’s great news for retail.

That’s one reason Silicon Valley is lit up with so many big data startups. All these startups are vying for a new marketplace that promises seriously big returns: the data explosion we’re all experiencing is estimated to be a $100 billion market. The prize goes to the one(s) that can figure out how to take all the fragmented consumer data and package it in a way that provides compelling narratives at very granular consumer levels. There’s so much data available it’s like taking thousands of shredded documents and re-assembling them by hand. But once the solution is realized it will be an enormous payday.

This means networking companies are gonna score big as well. Infrastructures will need to be redesigned to gather and crunch the data and spit out meaningful results. This opens new marketplaces for older, traditional companies as well: switches, networking gear, cable, servers, etc. When you consider the transformation “big data” brings, it will make the social media revolution seem like small potatoes. Just watch and see. And keep buying stuff on your smartphone. You’re creating massive amounts of data that thousands of people are feverishly working around the clock to harness and synthesize… all in the name of selling you stuff you didn’t know you needed.

HerHighway.com is taking some of todays most influential women in the online communities, placing them into some of today’s top vehicles, and letting them roam the country from Los Angeles to New York to raise money for Breast Cancer awareness.

You can attend a TweetUP in one of many stops across the country and meet all the amazing women who have volunteered their time to do the drive; Race-car drivers,  Social Media GURU’s, Automotive Experts,  Foodies and Fashionistas.

The schedule is as follows:

Starting Line September 25th leave Los Angeles CA – Vegas, NV – Salt Lake City UT

September 26th leave  Salt Lake City UT – Grand Junction CO – Denver CO

September 27th leave Denver CO – Colby KS – Salina KS

September 28th Salina KS – Kansas City MO – St. Louis MO

September 29th St. Louis MO – Bloomington IL- Chicago IL

September 30th Chicago IL – Indianapolis IN (special event)

October 1st Indianapolis IN – Columbus OH – Pittsburgh PA

October 2nd Pittsburgh PA – Philadelphia PA – NYC, NY Finish Line

Here’s a glimpse at just a few of the handful of Featured Ladies for this trip:

Social Media Advisers
Ann Tran
Misty Belardo
Zipporah Sandler
Joyce Cherrier

Automotive Journalists
Christina Selter, Editor HerHighway & Host
BJ Killeen, Drivers Talk
Cathy Droz, Two for the Road
Nina Russin, Carspondent

Motorsports
Judy Stropus, Retired Indy Crew Member/JVS Enterprises
Anne Proffit, Motorsports and Automotive Journalist
Shea Holbrook, Sports Car Racing
Ashley Van Dyke, AVD Motorsports

This September, make sure you start following the hashtag #HerHighway to follow along on what these amazing women are doing.

And hey, you may even see me (Krystyl) along the way! ;-)

Make sure to follow @HerHighWay on Twitter for updates on whats going on, and even a chance to win a seat for this roadtrip!

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