Author Archives: Brian Solis

About Brian Solis

Brian Solis is principal at Altimeter Group, a research-based advisory firm. Solis is globally recognized as one of the most prominent thought leaders and published authors in new media. A digital analyst, sociologist, and futurist, Solis has studied and influenced the effects of emerging media on business, marketing, publishing, and culture. His current book, Engage, is regarded as the industry reference guide for businesses to build and measure success in the social web.

by Brian Solis


(cc) Brian Solis, www.briansolis.com

Last night the digital land rush flooded Facebooks servers from all over the world as social mavens flocked to secure their username, and online legacy, on Facebook.

Vanity URLs, while long over due, are greatly appreciated and coveted. According to Larry Yu, a spokesman for Facebook, in a discussion with Bloomberg, new user names were registered at a rate of more than 550 a second. Within the 15 minutes after the floodgates opened at 9:01/12:01, 500,000 users had grabbed their desired or close to desired name.

Facebook is currently the world’s largest social network with over 200 million across the globe.

Connect with me on:
Twitter
, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Plaxo, Plurk, Identi.ca, BackType, or Facebook

Read more from Brian Solis:

Blog: PR 2.0
Book: Putting the Public Back in Public Relations
Social Map: The Conversation Prism

by Brian Solis

Flickr has finally joined the party for seamlessly connecting and sharing pictures directly to Twitter. Up until now, Twitpic and yfrog have dominated the Twitter stream for pictures, simply because they provided a tremendously easy system for snapping and uploading pictures to Twitter from mobile devices.

While I’m an avid photographer, I am not however, an avid camera-phone shutterbug. Up until recently, if I were so inclined to proactively share an image from my Flickr Pro account, I would do so manually. However, an age-old feature within Flickr has finally received a long overdue update, the ability to not only “blog this” image, but also “tweet it.”

Now, simply clicking on the “blog this” button above the image, you can now connect your Twitter account in addition to your blog. In doing so, it takes you to another window where you have roughly 120 characters remaining to frame the tweet. Flickr automatically provides a shortened “flic.kr” URL and embedds it into your Tweet to save time and effort.

To append your Flickr account with your Twitter credentials, click here.

Connect with me on:
Twitter
, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Plaxo, Plurk, Identi.ca, BackType, or Facebook

Read more from Brian Solis:

Blog: PR 2.0
Book: Putting the Public Back in Public Relations
Social Map: The Conversation Prism

by Brian Solis

Jeff Pulver’s 140 Character Conference (#140conf) will be taking place at New World Stages in New York City on June 16/17.

While the original scope of the event was to explore “the effects of twitter on: Celebrity, “The Media”, Advertising and (maybe) Politics”, the scope of the event has expanded and we will be covering these topics and a lot more. #140conf will be taking a look at twitter as a platform and will be taking a look at some of the industries which have been disrupted by the advent of twitter.

The schedule reflects the great variety of the subject areas we will be exploring and discussing at #140conf. The speakers represent a “cast of characters” whose presence will help define this event. I’m joining Tony Hsieh of Zappos on stage.

You can save $195 by using code “SOLIS” before midnight Tuesday. Register here.

Follow @140conf on twitter for updates.

Connect with me on:
Twitter
, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Plaxo, Plurk, Identi.ca, BackType, or Facebook

Read more from Brian Solis:

Blog: PR 2.0
Book: Putting the Public Back in Public Relations
Social Map: The Conversation Prism

by Brian Solis

Thank you Louis Gray for the invitation to the FriendFeed event tonight. Every so often, FriendFeed hosts its TGIFF (Thank Goodness It’s FriendFeed) where they invite FF enthusiasts to the company’s HQ to eat, drink and discuss everything from the state of FriendFeed and its next iterations to Silicon Valley and the future of the Web.

Tonight, I spent time with the FriendFeed team as well as with good friends Louis Gray, Steve Gillmor, Jeremiah Owyang, and Steve Rubel.

Perhaps the event was best immortalized with this picture of the FriendFeed team:

Dan Hsiao, Casey Muller, Ana Yang, Jim Norris, Tudor Bosman, Bret Taylor, Paul Buchheit (with Camilla), Sanjeev Singh, Kevin Fox

I’ll let the pictures tell the rest of the story…

Louis Gray, Steve Rubel, Brian Solis, Jeremiah Owyang

Steve Gillmor and Jeremiah Owyang

Steve Rubel with a Kindle version my new book with Deirdre Breakenridge, “Putting the Public Back in Public Relations

For more pictures from TGIFF, please visit my album on Flickr.

Connect with me on:
Twitter
, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Plaxo, Plurk, Identi.ca, BackType, or Facebook

Read more from Brian Solis:

Blog: PR 2.0
Book: Putting the Public Back in Public Relations
Social Map: The Conversation Prism


Source

The blog is now an old entity in the new Internet, the one that is forever evolving and moving forward at breakneck speed. We’re about to see the launch of Wolfram Alpha, the search engine that promises to search the Internet with a brain and offer results that are useful at first glance, unlike the huge lists we have to trawl through to find a semblance of what we’re looking for in the first place. But there’s a reason why the humble blog is still relevant in any setting, be it the present or the future, and that’s because it exists solely for the reader.

A blog is an outpouring of ideas and information that exists to satisfy two needs – the need to express in a blog writer, and the need for information and recreation in a reader. There are various reasons why people read blogs – some of them may search for one blog in particular because they know the author, others may stumble upon one in a random search operation and subscribe to its RSS feed after finding it to their liking, and yet others may be looking for certain information which they find to be factually correct and aesthetically presented in a particular blog. But there are probably just a handful of reasons for people to dislike blogs and shun them – because they are not interesting and because they have been written badly.

While it’s hard to make yourself interesting to a virtually unknown reader or capture the attention of all the people who stop by your blog, you can do something to improve the quality of the content on your blog. Good writing is important to draw repeat visitors because:

- People prefer information that is presented clearly and concisely.

- They are turned off by explicit grammatical and semantic mistakes.

- The quality of the content you provide is diluted if the language you use is not up to scratch.

- Spelling and grammatical mistakes can have disastrous consequences if they are misunderstood.

- If you fill your page with keywords just so you gain a higher ranking on Google and its ilk,
you’re not going to have any repeat visitors.

- Your content must be what the reader is looking for (according to their searches) or they’re likely to feel cheated.

- Your content must be easy to browse through and read at a glance.

If your blog is not doing as well as you expect it to, perhaps it’s time to go back and check the basics. Rather than spend time on the fancy accessories like page design and font selection, rather than obsess over the ads you want to place on your page, it’s best to conduct an analysis of your writing and try to inject the qualities that it lacks. Because, when it boils down to it, a blog is just the power of the written word.

This post was contributed by Kimberly Peterson, who writes about the health care administration. She welcomes your feedback at KimPeterson2006 at gmail.com